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New Friends are Silver, Old Friends Are Gold

Charley Brown
Johnny Carson shared with us a humorist view of life for over thirty years in The Tonight Show. At that time of day, Johnny sparkled like a royal diamond. He gave us so much. I remember, not submitting many school homeworks, because I simply refused to miss a Johnny Carson show. When he said Good By, during his last show, tears dropped from my eyes. It was like saying Good By to an old friend, who joked with you every single night for three whole decades.

There was always a man next to Johnny in all--if not most--of his shows. He was the introducer of the program. He was famous for saying; And now, Heeeeer's Joooooohnny, or something like that. His name is Ed McMahon. He was Johnny's comrade for forty-six years. After Johnny passed away, he decided to write a book remembering his life with this warm-hearted and witty man. Old friends are gold.

This post includes an excerpt of Ed's book, dubbed Here's Johnny, My Memories of Johnny Carson, The Tonight Show, and 46 Years of Friendship. Enjoy this touching remembrance of two golden friends.


Friend (Noun)
Word History: A friend is a lover, literally. The relationship between Latin amcus "friend" and am "I love" is clear, as is the relationship between Greek philos "friend" and phile "I love." In English, though, we have to go back a millennium before we see the verb related to friend. At that time, frond, the Old English word for "friend," was simply the present participle of the verb fron, "to love." The Germanic root behind this verb is *fr-, which meant "to like, love, be friendly to." Closely linked to these concepts is that of "peace," and in fact Germanic made a noun from this root, *frithu-, meaning exactly that. Ultimately descended from this noun are the personal names Frederick, "peaceful ruler," and Siegfried, "victory peace." The root also shows up in the name of the Germanic deity Frigg, the goddess of love, who lives on today in the word Friday, "day of Frigg," from an ancient translation of Latin Veneris dis, "day of Venus."

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